What is the difference between Stress and Anxiety and how you can manage it in your life?

Stress”With stress levels continuing to rise all over the world, people are becoming more conscious not only of the long-term effects of stress, but also of how unmanaged emotions compromise the quality of one’s day-to-day life, limiting mental clarity, productivity, adaptability to life’s challenges and enjoyment of its gifts. At the same time, most of us have experienced how positive emotional states, such as appreciation and care, add a quality of buoyancy and coherent flow to our lives, significantly enhancing our efficiency and effectiveness.” –Research Overview; The Institute of HeartMathIn today’s modern, high pressure, fast paced society, we all feel stress in varying degrees from time to time. Whether it is at work or at home, financial or relationship concerns, divorce, separation or bereavement, moving home, becoming a new parent, the list is seemingly endless and I am sure that you could easily add some of your own.Basically, anything that makes us angry, anxious or frustrated, instills a recognisable fear, or causes a change in our life can be termed as stress, even if that change is a positive one that will improve our life, we are naturally fearful of the unknown.There are several recognised types of stress, below are some of the more common ones:Emotional: relating to personal conflict.Mental or Physical Illness: Either yourself or a significant person in your life.Environmental: Caused by an outside influence.Push Push Shove: Too much to do, too little time.Hormonal: Puberty, PMT, Menopause, Mid-life crisis, etc.Allergic: Body reacts to allergens as poison.The Biology of StressOur bodies are designed to cope with small amounts of stress for short periods of time, it is only when we allow the stress levels to build up that it becomes a problem. Human beings, through our ancestors and all the way back to cavemen, have an inbuilt alarm system when we are in a threatening situation known as the ‘fight or flight’ response and it is this same internal reaction that is triggered by stress.Natural chemicals are released which increase both our breathing and heart rate, which in turn increases blood pressure so that more oxygenated blood can be pumped to our muscles. Adrenalin is released into the bloodstream that enables the liver to produce energy giving sugars, all of which prepare us to either fight the threat or run from it.However, with modern stress, neither of these reactions is usually relevant or indeed possible so if the stress is…
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